Obstetrics > Services
Normal Deliveries
Ashok Kumar has delivered three thousand babies during the course of his career - three of which the happy parents actually chose to name after him.

He's extremely experienced and willing to be telephoned day or night if you have any concerns about your pregnancy.
 
Caesarian Section
There are two kinds of Caesarian section: planned or emergency (which means unscheduled but not necessarily the result of some crisis). Some of the reasons for needing a caesarian are:
  • Your baby's head is too large to fit through your pelvis
  • The shape or size of your pelvis makes a vaginal birth more difficult
  • The placenta is lying low in the uterus blocking your baby's exit
  • You're expecting twins or triplets
  • Your baby's lying across the uterus, or is breech
  • Once labour has begun, your baby becomes distressed
  • You have eclampsia or severe pre-eclampsia
  • You're ill, have high blood pressure, or become exhausted in labour

For more information on how it's done please see :

BBC Site:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/pregnancy_fertility/birth_caesarean.shtml

NHS site:
http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Caesarean-section/Pages/Why-is-it-necessary.aspx
 
Pain Relief
How you feel about the pain and cope with it will depend on the individual - everyone's pain threshold differs. Complementary (or non drug) therapies are available (see below):
  • Mobile Epidurals - These allow the patient the benefit of epidural pain relief, while maintaining the ability to move. They are offered once labour has commenced.
  • Entonox - also known as 'gas and air'.
  • Pethidine.
  • Epidural - an anaesthetic drug is injected into the epidural space at the side of the spinal cord. It numbs the body from the lower back downwards. A thin tube is left in place to allow top-ups as needed. Research indicates that you're more likely to have an assisted delivery with an epidural.You may be offered a 'mobile' or low-dose epidural, which allows you to retain some feeling.

For more information please see :

The Portland Hospital (section on pain relief available)
http://www.theportlandhospital.com/Labour-Delivery.asp

BBC Site:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/pregnancy_fertility/birth_painrelief.shtml

NHS Site:
http://www.nhs.uk/livewell/pregnancy/Pages/Painrelief.aspx
 
Complementary Therapies

Pain-relief methods that don't involve drugs include:

  • Massage, usually done by your birth companion.
  • Relaxation, learned at antenatal classes.
  • Breathing exercises, learned at classes.
  • TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) - electrodes are placed on your back, which deliver a slight electrical charge to the nerve endings. This should be discussed with me during the antenatal period.
  • Hypnosis, either learned in advance or given by a therapist.
  • Acupuncture, given by a therapist.
  • Water, in a birth pool or a deep bath. This should be discussed with me during the antenatal period.
 
Cervical Sutures
For a cervical suture we place tape around your weak cervix to support it. This keeps your cervix closed to prevent your baby from coming through it. It can help prevent a miscarriage or premature birth if you have an incompetent cervix.

You could have an incompetent cervix because of previous surgery to your cervix, such as a cone biopsy, previous damage to your cervix, perhaps from repeated terminations of pregnancy or a weakness that you have had since birth or an increase in pressure on your cervix from a multiple pregnancy such as twins or triplets.

The operation is performed under a general anaesthetic usually between the fourteenth and sixteenth week of pregnancy.The cervical stitch is removed by a doctor at 37-38 weeks of pregnancy or when labour starts. The removal of the stitch does not usually require an anaesthetic.

For more information see

http://www.privatehealth.co.uk/private-operations/obstetrics/cervical-suture/
 
High Risk Pregnancies
Ashok Kumar is adept at ultrasound scanning for early pregnancy complications and then dealing with acute emergencies during labour such as shoulder dystocia (abnormal or difficult childbirth), cord prolapse (when the umbilical threatens to cut off oxygen and blood supplies to the fetus), eclampsia (includes seizures and coma that happen during pregnancy but are due to preexisting or organic brain disorder), and abruption of placenta (when the placental lining has separated from the uterus of the mother; the most common cause of late pregnancy bleeding as well as breech births (baby enters the birth canal feet first rather than head first).

This is a doctor with considerable experience in risk management in the hospital setting. He's updated the Junior Doctors' Departmental Handbook at Northwick Park Hospital in Harrow, focusing on measures to manage early pregnancy complications, hyperemesis gravidarum (a severe form of morning sickness, that prevents adequate intake of food and fluids), abdominal pain in early pregnancy and labour ward management.

Mr Kumar has designed departmental and clinical guidelines for the management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes, asthma as well as for the management of pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (includes seizures and coma that happen during pregnancy but are due to preexisting or organic brain disorder), preterm labour, the spontaneous rupture of membranes at term and pre term (less than 37 weeks) and perinatal (the time around the birth, after 22 weeks) management of hypertension.
 
Pregnancies with Medical Problems

Diabetes:

If you are diabetic and are planning to have a baby or think you are pregnant then it is vital that you seek medical advice.

Ashok Kumar is expert in treating pregnant women with diabetes, often seeing as many as forty such patients a week in antenatal clinics, and handling pregnancy with epilepsy or cardiac disease. He has conducted a national survey on diabetes in pregnancy and Obstetric Cholestasis and spent two and a half years in multi- disciplinary joint clinics for managing pregnant women with diabetes at the Royal Free Hospital, designing their guidelines for the management of diabetes during pregnancy, labour and post partum.

For more information on pregnancy and diabetes please see:

Diabetes UK:
http://www.diabetes.org.uk/Guide-to-diabetes/Living_with_diabetes/Pregnancy_and_diabetes/

NHS:
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/diabetes/Pages/Introduction.aspx

Sickle Cell Disease:

Ashok Kumar has done one of the very few surveys in the UK looking at the outcome of pregnancies complicated by sickle cell disease, something that's a growing problem in some London boroughs.

Hypertension:

Chronic Hypertension: This type of hypertension was present even before the woman was pregnant but may get worse during later pregnancy and the type or dose of drugs may need to be changed. Since a woman's blood pressure naturally falls during the first half of pregnancy, many chronic hypertensive women have a normal blood pressure and need no treatment at this time.

Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension (PIH): This type of hypertension is much like the chronic type, but it only comes on when a woman is pregnant and resolves completely after delivery.

Pre-eclampsia: is a disease unique to pregnancy. In addition to high blood pressure, the other main screening test is to check the urine. The kidneys become 'leaky' and in pre-eclampsia there is protein. If severe pre-eclampsia is not treated or if it develops very quickly, then eclampsia may occur. This is when a woman has a seizure.

Mr Kumar has designed departmental and clinical guidelines for the management pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, preterm labour, the spontaneous rupture of membranes at term and pre term (less than 37 weeks) and perinatal (the time around the birth, after 22 weeks) management of hypertension.

For more information see:

NHS
http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/pregnancycareplanner/Pages/Preeclampsia.aspx

BBC:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/pregnancy_fertility/pregnancy_trimester3_info.
shtml#high_blood_pressure
 
Private Secretary
07885 458 335

Mr. Ashok Kumar
07748 764 044

Enquiry Form

 

 

2010 MR. ASHOK KUMAR'S CLINIC
Developed By Stethoscope